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German Army vs. Soviet Partisans
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25
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German High Seas Fleet
German Navy Command Perspective
© 2010
621 pages; 20 chapters
 in TWO VOLUMES
German High Seas Fleet is a fascinating eye-opener that takes the
reader into virtually uncharted historic waters. There are few books extant
like
German High Seas Fleet because this e-book approaches the effort
to understand the
German High Seas Fleet from the standpoint of the
Supreme Commander of the
German High Seas Fleet, Admiral Sheer.
The reader will soon notice that he is privy to scores of secrets about the
inner workings of the
German High Seas Fleet as well as a clear
understanding of all the main battles engaged in by the
German High
Seas Fleet
during four years of bloody war. The e-book German High
Seas Fleet
is well illustrated with color pictures and charts detailing the
plans and operations of various elements of the
German High Seas
Fleet
to include submarines, heavy ships such as battleships
(dreadnaughts), and lighter ships such as destroyers and gun boats.
Presented in two precisely worked volumes,
German High Seas Fleet is
a collector’s item as well as a military work of art. There is nothing else like
it available anywhere.
VOLUME 1                     $30 if purchased individually
Review
Table of Contents

VOLUME 2                     $30 if purchased individually
Review
Table of Contents
"In judging the proceedings it must be borne in mind that at sea a leader adapts his action to the events taking place
around him. It may possibly reveal errors, which can only be accounted for later by reports from his own ships or valuable
information from enemy statements. The art of leadership consists in securing an approximately correct picture from the
impression of the moment, and then acting in accordance with it. The writer of history can then form a tactical inference
where obvious mistakes were made, or where a better grasp of the situation would have led to a more advantageous
decision. In this event a certain reticence should be observed in making definite assertions that a different movement
would have been more successful, for armed efficiency plays the chief part in success and cannot be determined with
mathematical precision. I have in mind one hit that did so much damage to our battle-cruiser Seydlitz on January 24,
1915, that one almost came to the conclusion that such ships could not stand many shots of such heavy caliber, and yet
the following battle proved the contrary. At all events, a good hit can seal the fate of a ship, even one of the strongest. A
naval battle may be open to criticism as to why it happened thus, but anyone who asserted that it might have happened
otherwise would be in danger of losing his case."
Excerpt from German High Seas Fleet
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German High Seas Fleet - German Navy Command Perspective
German High Seas Fleet - German Navy Command Perspective